Western Rite Critic

A Balance to Contagious Enthusiasm

Melkites Define Latinizations


Of the Blue BlanketWe’re not suggesting this has anything to do with Orthodox Western Rite adherents, but this is certainly an interesting list. It’s from a Melkite site, defining what they see as Latin accretions. Among the Latinizations, they list:

1. Unmarried priesthood
2. Statues
3. Altar rails
4. Confessional boxes
5. Stations of the Cross hanging on walls
6. 3-D Crucifixes on walls
7. Western-style paintings
8. Suppression of liturgical hours
9. Suppression of Presanctified in favour of Divine Liturgy
10. Use of Western style Mass instead of the Liturgies of St. John Crystsostom or St. Basil
11. Introduction of Western prayers: the Rosary, etc.
12. Introduction of Western music and songs
13. Use of musical instruments
14. Emphasizing the words of Institution and silencing the Epiklesis prayers
15. Truncation of prayers, esp. psalms in liturgies
16. Reduction of prostrations and reverences
17. Use of Genuflections, Kneeling
18. Combining Divine Liturgy with other services: marriage, funeral
19. Not distributing the antidoron
20. Elimination of using hot water during Consecration
21. Not having a curtain behind the Royal Doors
23. First Communion and Chrismation separated from Baptism

Advertisements

March 1, 2008 - Posted by | Western Rite Liturgics, Western Rite Pieties, Western Rite Quotes | , , , , , ,

4 Comments »

  1. […] article is a followup to Melkites Define Latinizations from March 1st, and is actually a  comment appended to that article by Monk […]

    Pingback by Latinizations Revisited « Western Rite Critic | March 16, 2008 | Reply

  2. My 3 questions have to do with hot water, crucifixes, separation of communion and chrismation:

    Hot water: are you certain? I’m not challenging you on it, but can you elaborate? I had understood differently.

    Crucifixes: can you expand on this a bit? Was this the universal Western practice? How old is it? Did it develop from aesthetic or doctrinal trends that we know of?

    Separation of Communion from Chrismation: You date this from, essentially, St. Augustine. Do you think his opinions and speculations on the subjects of infant baptism, etc. are in any way related? Does this have to do with the notion of an age of accountability?

    Comment by tuD | March 15, 2008 | Reply

  3. This is excellent, thank you. That’s the thing; if WR adherents will be honest about the tradition, then we can have a real debate about whether innovations are appropriate, and whether in fact the rhetoric of “restoring the Orthodoxy of the West” is accurate. It’s in the attempt to have it both ways – to make claims about the one while in fact simply re-creating a Roman Catholicism/Anglicanism of the previous century or semi-century, that means we can’t have a conversation. For either we must accept falsehoods as the ground of the discussion, or we must first repudiate those, and ask them to concede those points, and then we can talk.

    Comment by tuD | March 15, 2008 | Reply

  4. Let’s see how these practices compare to the liturgical practice of Orthodox Christians of the West before the Schism.

    1. Unmarried priesthood

    They had that, though many exceptions were made, and even advocated by Saints, and that even up to the very eve of the Schism of Rome.

    2. Statues

    They had statues, some of them wonder-working, though flat Byzantine-style iconography was also very common and even more prevalent.

    3. Altar rails

    They didn’t have those. Altar rails were invented during the Counter-Reformation.

    4. Confessional boxes

    They didn’t have those. Confessional boxes were invented in the Counter-Reformation.

    5. Stations of the Cross hanging on walls

    They didn’t have those; the Stations of the Cross did not appear till Reformation times, and did not attain its current format until almost the 19th century.

    6. 3-D Crucifixes on walls

    They had those.

    7. Western-style paintings

    They definitely didn’t have Western-style paintings . By which I mean fleshy, post-renaissance realism in church art.

    8. Suppression of liturgical hours

    They didn’t have any problem preserving the liturgical hours. In fact, they kept them up much better than ER Orthodox do today.

    9. Suppression of Presanctified in favour of Divine Liturgy

    They always had full Mass instead of Presanctifieds, except on Holy Friday. However, several Popes ratified not only the bulk of the canons of the Quinisext Oecumenical Council, but ALL its canons, which theoretically and legally, for a time, abolished this Western practice.

    10. Use of Western style Mass instead of the Liturgies of St. John Crystsostom or St. Basil

    N/A

    11. Introduction of Western prayers: the Rosary, etc.

    Western Christians back then didn’t use Western prayers . That is, they did not have the rosary, or other emotionalistic Roman Catholic devotions.

    12. Introduction of Western music and songs

    They definitely didn’t have that . That is, the songs spoken of here, they didn’t use.

    13. Use of musical instruments

    They did not use musical instruments in worship, with the exception of some historical disagreement about how the organs in Anglo-Saxon churches were utilised. But as a general rule, musical instruments were not allowed in church services.

    14. Emphasizing the words of Institution and silencing the Epiklesis prayers

    This stylism has to do with Melkite liturgy, which I don’t even understand.

    15. Truncation of prayers, esp. psalms in liturgies

    They didn’t truncate things to the extent so many ER Orthodox do today.

    16. Reduction of prostrations and reverences

    They had no dearth of those, though fewer than in the Old Rite of the Russians.

    17. Use of Genuflections, Kneeling

    They mainly knelt on penitential days, since kneeling was seen as an inherently penitential expression. They maintained the rule that we should never kneel on Sundays.

    18. Combining Divine Liturgy with other services: marriage, funeral

    This they did constantly, and it is a legitimate expression of Western Orthodoxy. Of course to Melkites it’s an external imposition.

    19. Not distributing the antidoron

    They distributed antidoron.

    20. Elimination of using hot water during Consecration

    The West never had the tradition of hot water during the Liturgy, so… N/A.

    21. Not having a curtain behind the Royal Doors

    They had curtains over the holy doors in the chancel screen.

    23. First Communion and Chrismation separated from Baptism

    This separation, it must be admitted, prevailed in the West rom about the fourth or fifth century onward.

    I don’t plan to draw any conclusions, just pointing out how many “Melkite Latinisations” are Roman Catholicisms that would be just as extraneous and inappropriate for historic Western Orthodox worship.

    Comment by hieromonachusaidanus | March 15, 2008 | Reply


Thoughts, Opinions, Comments?

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: